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Meeting Recap--February 24, 2018

Nine of us made it to the meeting this fine Spring-like day in Winter.

Larry opened the session with a prayer that thanked the Lord for the fine weather and an appeal for the Lord's guidance to the medical folks that will be engaged in bringing Dennis back to good health.

We set March 10th as the day for our next ride, weather permitting. The ride proposed is a relatively short (124 mile) loop through adjacent counties to the north, as depicted in :  If the 10th needs to be canceled for weather reasons we will try again on March 17th.

A short video of a small German village being awakened by a 300 kph motorcycle pass through, got everyone's attention :

We discussed the Trans America Trail, best known as the TAT , and through a video of a father-sons recent ride gained an appreciation of some of the obstacles and hazards presented by the various terrains that must be crossed.

MC Garage described the "why and how" of  motorcycle "slipper clutches".

Larry told the group of the multi-day ride he's working on for late Spring that would take in camping in North Carolina and east Tennessee. Details will follow at a later meeting.

The meeting adjourned to the parking lot around 11:15 am where Dave got everyone envious, looking over his new Triumph Bonneville. Nice bike!

From the parking lot Dave, Mel, Steve D, and yours truly had a great ride, albeit short, over to Silvia's at the top of Sugar Pike, for burritos or hamburgers under the umbrella outside. Pleasant place.

Mel then took off for Athens, I went home, and Dave and Steve headed for WOW. Seems the Spring new bike bug has bitten. Keep tuned.


Tallulah Gorge--November 11, 2017

Mellish promised chilly temps and lots of sun. We got the chilly but the sun, not so much.

Four of us (Dave, Al, Richard and Bob s.) left Hickory Flat promptly at 9 am on our way to meet Mel in Cleveland at 10:30. We arrived within minutes of each other and after a pit stop and warm up at the local Chick-Fil-A we were soon passing through Clarkesville, and Hollywood on our way to Tallulah Gorge State Park where we hoped to witness the gorge and falls as it used to be before Georgia Power dammed the river in 1913.

On selected weekends in the Spring and Fall Georgia power releases a very large quantity of water from behind the dam into the gorge and the rush of water at 700 cfs gives viewers a chance to see why Tallulah Falls was a major tourist attraction in the 1800's.

When we turned on to Jane Hurt Yarn Drive (park entrance) it was immediately apparent that we were not the only folks interested in the day's release. Cars were parked on the shoulders well before the entrance and the parking lot was full and then some. Four of our bikes crammed into one spot while another put the side stand down between a rock and a bush.

Crowded yes, but worth the effort to get around to the numerous overlooks and the 300 plus stairs down to the suspension bridge that crosses the gorge at Hurricane Falls. Rather than trying to describe what we saw at these points, take a look at this video;

After taking it all in we worked our way out of the park heading for the town of Tallulah Falls for lunch. Our first choice was a grill less than a mile away but on entering we were told the couldn't accommodate us as they were overextended serving the group they already had seated. Richard consulted his trusty smart phone and we headed on south on 441 again but never found the restaurant. A quick huddle and we decided we'd go to one we knew of, the Chick-Fil-A we visited in the morning. Luckily we found it, ate and relaxed for a good while reliving the day and solving the world's problems.

Leaving Cleveland we split up, with Mel heading toward Athens and the rest of us off  to Dahlonega, then home before dark.

A good day riding, hiking and playing tourist. Round trip to/from Hickory Flat was around 190 miles.     

Back To The Cherohala --October 14, 2017


 On a gray and misty Saturday morning, three riders (BobK, Larry and Mike) met in Ball Ground for a trip across the incomparable Cherohala Skyway connecting Tellico Plains (far SE TN) with Robbinsville (far W NC).

The Cherohala was built to promote tourism in the area and the name combines the two national forests it passes through – the Cherokee and the Nantahala. The term “Skyway” applies because the road traverses the upper ridge lines of the southern Appalachians (elevation 3000’ – 5400’) and offers gorgeous vistas on both sides. Different than the Blue Ridge Parkway, the Skyway curves aren’t as tight and the road is paved wider and with numerous scenic turnouts, resulting in a better flowing, spectacular roadway perfect for motorcycles.


We left Ball Ground and took the fast lane to Blue Ridge, in rain gear mostly for the extra warmth it provided against the cooler-than-forecasted start of the day. After a coffee stop in Blue Ridge, we shed the rain pants, but still needed something over our summer mesh jackets. From there it was beautiful TN 68 to Tellico. We thoroughly enjoyed our trip across the Skyway and at the eastern end had a decision to make… backtrack the Skyway, then lunch in Tellico and home… or a quicker lunch in Robbinsville, then loop SW toward home. Food wins!

We found a lunch spot perfect for Bikers – The Hub – with BBQ and upscale American diner menu served on their large and casual covered patio. We’ll be back.

After lunch we finally felt the forecasted warmth and shed the extra gear. From Robbinsville, we traveled S to Topton (where the Nantahala Gorge begins), then took the fast lane down thru Andrews and Murphy to Blue Ridge, then 515 / 575 home to Cherokee. A 300 mile day of good riding and good company. What more can you ask for? Join us next time.

A Day In The Woods--October 18, 2017

Larry and Bob S. took advantage of some free time and a promising day to explore some less frequently used Forest Service roads in the Chattahoochee National Forest

They entered the forest off of Nimblewill Church Road on FS 28-1, went up past Camp Wahsega, then up the hill on FS 80  to its junction with FS-42 (aka Cooper Gap Rd.), north of Camp Merrill. It was an enjoyable ride but nothing new so far. Going west on 42, a ways past the cliffs, they got on FS-69 (Rock Creek Rd) to see what they could see.

FS 69's surface was on par with most better FS roads and allowed a quick ride all the way to the fish hatchery. They stopped there and inspected the many ponds full of different size and color trout (Brook, Brown, Rainbow??) Larry figured this open- to- the-sky area must attract eagles or other raptors. On their way back to the KLR and Ural a few "ranger" vehicles appeared. The two motorcyclists thought they were in for it, as they were in a "Do Not Enter" "Official Vehicles Only" area. Not so, the "rangers" were friendly, telling them them that not only raptors but bears and other hungry ones made it over or through the fences to feast on the fish. They also gave a verbal description of how to get to the swinging bridge over  the Toccoa without running out to Ga 60. It sounded doable (if you could remember all the twist and turns).

 Most sane people get to the bridge on the short ride off of Ga 60. Not them. They took an unmarked road (FS 248) over a small bridge then turned right onto another unmarked "road"(FS 333), forded a stream, and continued on to what they figured was likely near the south side of the bridge (they never saw the gate the rangers promised). They took a chance and hiked down the steep Benton McKay trail to the river and there was the bridge.

After lounging on the bridge for a while, enjoying the sun, they thought about lunch at VanZandts. Again the boring way to get there was to back track to FS 69 and head for Ga 60 and Dial road. But on a map they saw what they thought might be an extension of  FS 333 that seamed to reach Doublehead Gap Road. Then an  adventure began.

As they headed west the "road" looked less and less traveled, eventually leading to a washed out, down hill cut barely wide enough for the Ural.The narrow KLR made it down on the more-or-less stable right side of the cut, but the three wheel  Ural had to ride part of the way down with the sidecar wheel on the higher right side and the bike wheels in the washed out left side ditch, not a good posture for a hack.  Well about half way down the Ural tipped too far and tried to climb the cut's bank, stripping off, as Urals do, the low left muffler. Larry, seeing the situation, walked back up the hill and put his body weight on the side car step and the two made their way down, took out the tools, and re-attached the muffler.

Still not to Doublehead Gap they pushed along not knowing what to expect, but not wanting to turn back up that hill. Glory be, they eventually came to a graveled road that led eventually to Doublehead Gap Road and an easy ride to VanZandts

After a late lunch Bob talked Larry into one more exploration, a road the is  temptingly named Old Dial Road. The lightly used road was paved in Dial but eventually turned to gravel as it skirted the Toccoa and made its swisty way north toward Morganton. About two thirds the way to Morganton it again was paved and soon was stop signed at Ga 60. As it was getting late in the day the two then took Ga 60 back to Dial Road and headed off to home.

It was a fine fine day in the outdoors with just enough adventure to keep one coming back again and again.



Fall ’17 Camp-n-Ride--September 29,30 2017

Is there a better time than fall for riding and camping in the north Georgia mountains? - No!  Friday afternoon 5 riders (BobK, Dave, Larry, Mel, and Scott) sneaked away from work and met for an overnight ride to Suches. Beautiful sunny weather and a forecasted cool down awaited us. We traveled old favorite backroads like Grandview and 136 though the Burnt Mountain area and then Sunrise and Doublehead Gap around the west side of the forest to a well-deserved break at Van Zandt’s in Dial. Although we were seeing more clouds than sun, surely it wouldn’t rain on our camping parade?




At Dial, Dave, Larry and Mel split off to take forest service roads to Suches while BobK and Scott traveled “twisty 60” to our overnight destination, Two Wheels Only of Suches, or TWO. Since Bob and Scott made better time, they arrived first, picked a nice grassy area next to the creek and set up their tents – just before the skies opened up! Oh well, typical for Suches in the summer (elevation 3000’ – there’s a reason everything is so green). Dave/Larry/Mel were just exiting the forest when it started raining and made a mad dash to TWO’s porch and rockers to wait out the shower before setting up tents, staying (mostly) dry.


 TWO had a nice crowd of riders from all surrounding states as well as a good contingent of locals. Steaks were great and the fellowship even better. The cool evening was perfect for a hot fire and cold beverages.

 In the morning we enjoyed TWO’s hot breakfast, then broke camp. With no Saturday day-trippers joining us, we headed out early for an entirely traffic-free trip (!!) across Wolf Pen Gap toward Brasstown Bald. We rode the twisty spur up and back, but didn’t take in the overlook since prime leaf-peeping was still several weeks out. We also enjoyed light traffic to 75, then S to Helen where we “touristed it up” at King Ludgwig’s Biergarten for lunch and people watching – we weren’t disappointed, with either.


 Here's are video clips from the ride


After lunch, Mel departed toward home in Athens while the rest of us partook the Richard Russell Scenic Highway northward, then 19 southward to a break at Neel’s Gap (on the AT) then on to Dahlonega. From there it was backroads to Dawson, then East Cherokee and home. Mileage was 235 for the two days and home by 3 PM. It was a great time and I doubt I can wait another year for another camp-n-ride opportunity. Join us next time.